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1
Sources:
Title: 1880 Van Zandt Co TX Census, page 065, line 7, dwelling 316, family 331 (Berry, Hugh)
Note: 1880 Van Zandt Co TX Census, page 065, line 7, dwelling 316, family 331:
Berry, Hugh, white male, age 44 (1836), married. Farmer. Born in AL. Father born in (AL), no birthplace for mother.
N. E. Caroline, white female, age 55 (1825), wife, married. Keeping house. Born in NC. Parents born in NC.
Hager, Una, white female, age 19 (1861), daughter, widowed. At home. Born in TX. Father born in AL. Mother born in NC.
Berry, C. W., white male, age 13 (1867), grandson, single. Works on farm. Bornin TX. Father born inTX. Mother born in LA.
Arminta, white female, age 11 (1869), granddaughter, single. Born inTX. Father born in TX, mother born in LA.
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Census
Title: Ballard, Carol Berry (Berry Family)
Note: Carol Berry Ballard
13237 Montfort #432
Dallas, TX 75240
(6/23/98)
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Letter
Text: added maiden name
Title: 1870 Van Zandt Co TX Census, page 193, line 9, dwelling 520, family 580 (Berry, Hugh)
Note: 1870 Van Zandt Co TX Census, page 193, line 9, dwelling 520, family 580:
Berry, Hugh, age 35 (1835), male, white. Farmer. $800 real estae, $250 personal estate. Born in AL.
Nancy, age 46 (1824), female, white. Keeping house. Born in NC.
Francis, age 17 (1853), female, white. At home. Born inTX.
Thos. W., age 15 (1855), male, white. Farm hand. Born in TX.
Nice, age 9 (1861), female, white. Born in TX.
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Census
Title: Ballard, Carol Berry (Berry Family)
Note: Carol Berry Ballard
13237 Montfort #432
Dallas, TX 75240
(6/23/98)
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Letter  
BERRY Eunice Elizabeth (I0019)
 
2
Sources:
Title: 1880 Van Zandt Co TX Census, page 065, line 7, dwelling 316, family 331 (Berry, Hugh)
Note: 1880 Van Zandt Co TX Census, page 065, line 7, dwelling 316, family 331:
Berry, Hugh, white male, age 44 (1836), married. Farmer. Born in AL. Father born in (AL), no birthplace for mother.
N. E. Caroline, white female, age 55 (1825), wife, married. Keeping house. Born in NC. Parents born in NC.
Hager, Una, white female, age 19 (1861), daughter, widowed. At home. Born in TX. Father born in AL. Mother born in NC.
Berry, C. W., white male, age 13 (1867), grandson, single. Works on farm. Bornin TX. Father born inTX. Mother born in LA.
Arminta, white female, age 11 (1869), granddaughter, single. Born inTX. Father born in TX, mother born in LA.
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Census
Title: Ballard, Carol Berry (Berry Family)
Note: Carol Berry Ballard
13237 Montfort #432
Dallas, TX 75240
(6/23/98)
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Letter
Text: added maiden name
Title: 1870 Van Zandt Co TX Census, page 193, line 9, dwelling 520, family 580 (Berry, Hugh)
Note: 1870 Van Zandt Co TX Census, page 193, line 9, dwelling 520, family 580:
Berry, Hugh, age 35 (1835), male, white. Farmer. $800 real estae, $250 personal estate. Born in AL.
Nancy, age 46 (1824), female, white. Keeping house. Born in NC.
Francis, age 17 (1853), female, white. At home. Born inTX.
Thos. W., age 15 (1855), male, white. Farm hand. Born in TX.
Nice, age 9 (1861), female, white. Born in TX.
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Census
Title: Ballard, Carol Berry (Berry Family)
Note: Carol Berry Ballard
13237 Montfort #432
Dallas, TX 75240
(6/23/98)
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Letter  
KIRKPATRICK Nancy Elizabeth Caroline (I0020)
 
3 "Johannes Hager was born December 26, 1759 in Kirchhain, Kesselstadt, Hesse Kassel, Germany. At age 16 he took an apprenticeship as a blacksmith, a trade he later practiced in Virginia. At age 18 he joined the Hesse-Kassel Jager Corps, Second Company. During the American Revolution, the British were short of troops to defend their colony in North America and called on the Hesse-Kassel Jager Corps for approximately 16,992 troops for assistance. Johannes being a large, stoutly built man was selected as one of the soldiers. They were told that they were to garrison a fort on the western coast of the British Isles. Much against their wills they were marched from their homeland and placed on ships, still under the assurance that they were going to England. They sailed for weeks without sighting land and realized that they had been deceived. They landed at Charleston, South Carolina in September of 1780. By that time Johannes had learned some English from the British sailors on board ship. The landing confirmed a decision that Johannes had made during the trip. He would not return to his father land, Germany and that he would join the Americans in their struggle for liberty as soon as possible.

He engaged in one or two battles against the Americans, remaining constantly alert for an opportunity to escape. He found that opportunity when he was placed on picket duty on the banks of the Broad River. Colonel Sumter's men were not far away and there had been irregular skirmishes for several days. He was on a four hour watch starting at 2:00 AM.

When the Corporal of the Guard had gotten out of earshot, he threw down the muskets, keeping his side arms and started toward what he hoped was the American line. He traveled until daylight, and then on into the second night often having to avoid straggling companies of British Light Horse. He was not insensible to the danger attending upon such a step, desertion from the ranks by all known rules of warfare was death. He had deserted as he did his post of picket duty, going with the uniform of a British soldier, in the direction of the American camp. Not knowing where that was, being but little acquainted with the language of the people, and in almost entire ignorance of the county through which he was to travel before reaching camp, in danger of recapture by a straggling band of British Soldiers or ambushed from the pine and palmetto thickets, or canebrakes of the swamps, by the alert and watchful South Carolinian, supported by the unerring aim of his rifle.

On the third day, he happened upon a Negro chopping wood. The Negro saw him, but was prevented giving alarm before Johannes had him completely within the range of his pistol. With the little English that he knew, he presented himself as a regular British soldier and found that the Negro's master was a Tory. The Negro helped him with food from his master?s house. Johannes later found out from a white man who came along the road that the Americans were near the river. He retraced his steps and came upon the river opposite the Americans at 9:00 PM. He called across to the Americans asking them to come to his side of the river. They feared a trap and refused, so he waited until daylight. Through the fog and mist that lay on the water, he waded into the stream as far as he was able. He appealed to the Americans to come with a boat and finally two of them did. He gave up his arms and told them his story. He gave them his arms, two fine large army pistols and a sword and told them of his desire to see the officer in command.

The soldiers took him to Colonel Sumter where he again repeated his story, and where Sumter restored his arms and assigned him to duty as a soldier. Sumter's wife was with him on the entire campaign of the Broad River and its tributaries. On the occasion of a skirmish, Johannes was detailed as guard near the carriage in which Sumter's wife was. She was greatly overcome by the excitement and swooned away. Johannes was as excited as well by this as by the near proximity of the British and gathered his cup full of muddy water from out in the road and dashed its entire contents in her face, this being done he went to the front of the engagement and there fought until the close.

On his return Mrs. Sumter had revived, but her face was a sad plight indeed. It was because of merriment with Sumter who afterwards took Johannes in to closer confidence making him one of his immediate attendants.

Johannes Hager fought with the Americans until Yorktown, and then settled in Amherst County, Virginia. He went to Wythe County as a blacksmith, and while there he rode with Anthony Wayne on his raid against the Indians. After this campaign, he returned and in Augusta County, Virginia on October 22, 1785 he married Anna Maria Shrader, daughter of George Shrader, a highly respectable German family formerly of Pennsylvania. Maria had been born on October 22, 1755. At the time of their marriage, they moved to Amherst County, Virginia about 25 miles from present day Lynchburg, Virginia, on or near the James River. Maria's father owned a large merchant mill during the Revolutionary War. He and his sons all joined the American Army so during the war the mill had been run by Maria. She was a woman of extraordinary strength. She could carry on her shoulder large bags of grain. As further proof of her strength, it was related by Johannes to his son Daniel that she was the best reaper of grain in the harvest field when disputing the championship with the reap hook.

When she was in sole charge of the mill, a party of Continental Soldiers came to the mill, under the charge of a young man, a Commissary. The Commissary gave orders as to the number of bags of grain he wanted and the number to each of the three wagons. On loading the wagons, one of the soldiers took one or two bags more than was allotted to his wagon, which being discovered by the then Miss Shrader, she remonstrated with him and proceeded to the wagon and took from it a bag of grain and started back into the mill with it. As she went, however, the soldier struck her with his hand in her face, which fact she at once communicated to the young Commissary who there upon tied the offender to his wagon and have him a sever whipping, applying the whip with his left hand.

Sometime after, the end of the war, trouble reputedly settled upon Johannes and Maria Hager in the form of money problems. It is suggested that they had to declared bankruptcy and this was the reason for their move to Floyd County, Kentucky to what was called the Block House Bottom, halfway between Prestonsburg and Paintsville about 1821. Daniel Hager, the youngest son of Johannes Hager, Sr describes his father as being six feet in height and weighing from 196 to 205 pounds. He had a large scar on his right cheek from a saber wound received in a South Carolina battle.

Before Maria Shrader Hager's death, when Daniel was still a young man, old Colonel Thomas C Brown, the ancestor of the Browns who lived in Floyd, Johnson, Morgan and Lawrence Counties, a soldier of the Revolutionary War came to see her. He was a man of large and powerful build, and in point of physical build was said to have been the most powerful of the whole surrounding country of a strong and hearty people. It seems that from his story that in old Virginia, where his father resided, it was the custom to call in the neighbors assembled to help the father of the young Brown to raise a house. The young boy was climbing up the corner of the house by lifting himself by the ends of the projecting ends of the hewn logs. He was approaching the top where a neighbor was engaged in chopping off the ends, unconscious of the near approach of young Brown from below, and young Brown unconscious of his danger, kept climbing and put his hand and wrist on top of the log above just in time to receive the descending blow from above, which at once severed the hand from the wrist.
 
HAGER Johannes "John" (I4034)
 
4 "Johannes Hager was born December 26, 1759 in Kirchhain, Kesselstadt, Hesse Kassel, Germany. At age 16 he took an apprenticeship as a blacksmith, a trade he later practiced in Virginia. At age 18 he joined the Hesse-Kassel Jager Corps, Second Company. During the American Revolution, the British were short of troops to defend their colony in North America and called on the Hesse-Kassel Jager Corps for approximately 16,992 troops for assistance. Johannes being a large, stoutly built man was selected as one of the soldiers. They were told that they were to garrison a fort on the western coast of the British Isles. Much against their wills they were marched from their homeland and placed on ships, still under the assurance that they were going to England. They sailed for weeks without sighting land and realized that they had been deceived. They landed at Charleston, South Carolina in September of 1780. By that time Johannes had learned some English from the British sailors on board ship. The landing confirmed a decision that Johannes had made during the trip. He would not return to his father land, Germany and that he would join the Americans in their struggle for liberty as soon as possible.

He engaged in one or two battles against the Americans, remaining constantly alert for an opportunity to escape. He found that opportunity when he was placed on picket duty on the banks of the Broad River. Colonel Sumter's men were not far away and there had been irregular skirmishes for several days. He was on a four hour watch starting at 2:00 AM.

When the Corporal of the Guard had gotten out of earshot, he threw down the muskets, keeping his side arms and started toward what he hoped was the American line. He traveled until daylight, and then on into the second night often having to avoid straggling companies of British Light Horse. He was not insensible to the danger attending upon such a step, desertion from the ranks by all known rules of warfare was death. He had deserted as he did his post of picket duty, going with the uniform of a British soldier, in the direction of the American camp. Not knowing where that was, being but little acquainted with the language of the people, and in almost entire ignorance of the county through which he was to travel before reaching camp, in danger of recapture by a straggling band of British Soldiers or ambushed from the pine and palmetto thickets, or canebrakes of the swamps, by the alert and watchful South Carolinian, supported by the unerring aim of his rifle.

On the third day, he happened upon a Negro chopping wood. The Negro saw him, but was prevented giving alarm before Johannes had him completely within the range of his pistol. With the little English that he knew, he presented himself as a regular British soldier and found that the Negro's master was a Tory. The Negro helped him with food from his master?s house. Johannes later found out from a white man who came along the road that the Americans were near the river. He retraced his steps and came upon the river opposite the Americans at 9:00 PM. He called across to the Americans asking them to come to his side of the river. They feared a trap and refused, so he waited until daylight. Through the fog and mist that lay on the water, he waded into the stream as far as he was able. He appealed to the Americans to come with a boat and finally two of them did. He gave up his arms and told them his story. He gave them his arms, two fine large army pistols and a sword and told them of his desire to see the officer in command.

The soldiers took him to Colonel Sumter where he again repeated his story, and where Sumter restored his arms and assigned him to duty as a soldier. Sumter's wife was with him on the entire campaign of the Froad River and its tributaries. On the occasion of a skirmish, Johannes was detailed as guard near the carriage in which Sumter's wife was. She was greatly overcome by the excitement and swooned away. Johannes was as excited as well by this as by the near proximity of the British and gathered his cup full of muddy water from out in the road and dashed its entire contents in her face, this being done he went to the front of the engagement and there fought until the close.

On his return Mrs. Sumter had revived, but her face was a sad plight indeed. It was because of merriment with Sumter who afterwards took Johannes in to closer confidence making him one of his immediate attendants.

Johannes Hager fought with the Americans until Yorktown, and then settled in Amherst County, Virginia. He went to Wythe County as a blacksmith, and while there he rode with Anthony Wayne on his raid against the Indians. After this campaign, he returned and in Augusta County, Virginia on October 22, 1785 he married Anna Maria Shrader, daughter of George Shrader, a highly respectable German family formerly of Pennsylvania. Maria had been born on October 22, 1755. At the time of their marriage, they moved to Amherst County, Virginia about 25 miles from present day Lynchburg, Virginia, on or near the James River. Maria's father owned a large merchant mill during the Revolutionary War. He and his sons all joined the American Army so during the war the mill had been run by Maria. She was a woman of extraordinary strength. She could carry on her shoulder large bags of grain. As further proof of her strength, it was related by Johannes to his son Daniel that she was the best reaper of grain in the harvest field when disputing the championship with the reap hook.

When she was in sole charge of the mill, a party of Continental Soldiers came to the mill, under the charge of a young man, a Commissary. The Commissary gave orders as to the number of bags of grain he wanted and the number to each of the three wagons. On loading the wagons, one of the soldiers took one or two bags more than was allotted to his wagon, which being discovered by the then Miss Shrader, she remonstrated with him and proceeded to the wagon and took from it a bag of grain and started back into the mill with it. As she went, however, the soldier struck her with his hand in her face, which fact she at once communicated to the young Commissary who there upon tied the offender to his wagon and have him a sever whipping, applying the whip with his left hand.

Sometime after, the end of the war, trouble reputedly settled upon Johannes and Maria Hager in the form of money problems. It is suggested that they had to declared bankruptcy and this was the reason for their move to Floyd County, Kentucky to what was called the Block House Bottom, halfway between Prestonsburg and Paintsville about 1821. Daniel Hager, the youngest son of Johannes Hager, Sr describes his father as being six feet in height and weighing from 196 to 205 pounds. He had a large scar on his right cheek from a saber wound received in a South Carolina battle.

Before Maria Shrader Hager's death, when Daniel was still a young man, old Colonel Thomas C Brown, the ancestor of the Browns who lived in Floyd, Johnson, Morgan and Lawrence Counties, a soldier of the Revolutionary War came to see her. He was a man of large and powerful build, and in point of physical build was said to have been the most powerful of the whole surrounding country of a strong and hearty people. It seems that from his story that in old Virginia, where his father resided, it was the custom to call in the neighbors assembled to help the father of the young Brown to raise a house. The young boy was climbing up the corner of the house by lifting himself by the ends of the projecting ends of the hewn logs. He was approaching the top where a neighbor was engaged in chopping off the ends, unconscious of the near approach of young Brown from below, and young Brown unconscious of his danger, kept climbing and put his hand and wrist on top of the log above just in time to receive the descending blow from above, which at once severed the hand from the wrist."



 
SHRADER Anna Maria (I4035)
 
5 1900 US Census, Georgia, Twiggs County, Sheet No 10
Dated: 20 Jun 1900 
THARP Linton Allen, Sr (I8811)
 
6 A Confederate soldier, was killed at eighteen years of age in the Battle at Bayou Boeuff, Louisiana.

Never married 
BERRY Joseph F (I0486)
 
7 A Quaker and Revolutionary Soldier ALLENTHARP Jacob (I1957)
 
8 According to an interview with Archibald, son of John Allen Tharp, Jr, his grandfather, John Allen Tharp Sr, died at the age of 80 in Denton County after breaking his collar bone. He was helping bring in a load of hay and was sitting on top of the load when they hit a stump and he fell off breaking his collar bone.

John Allen Tharp, Sr was born in 1816. His headstone indicates he died in 1896 which would make him 80 at the time of his death. 
THARP John Allen, Sr (I0231)
 
9 According to Draft Registration Document his birth date is September 6, 1877 SEVIER Ernest Newton (I7219)
 
10 According to her death certificate, Reedith died of a gunshot wound to the chest which pierced a corner of her heart. Although homicide was definitely ruled out there was insufficient evidence to show if this was a suicide or a tragic accident. NORMAN Reedith Estella (I7681)
 
11 According to the 1930 census in Dallas, Texas, he was an accountant for a plow company. KERSH QM1 Charles Samuel (I3505)
 
12 According to Veda Tharp, Velma died in 1906 at the age of 2. THARP Velma (I0627)
 
13 After the death of his mother, Bart was reared by his uncle and aunt, Robert (Bob) and Greene Ashley Gwaltney. Bart's Uncle Bob was killed in a hunting accident in 1907. Aunt Greene continued to live with Bart's family until her death.

After an appropriate education in the area's rural schools, Bart became a prosperous young farmer.

In 1920, Bart, his young wife, his father, and his "Aunt Greene" moved from the family homeplace on Newbell's Branch to a hilltop home overlooking the town of Hickman. In that home Bart and Edna continued their lives together for sixty-one years. They lived simple, yet productive, lives and accepted with ease the modern conveniences that were made availabe through the years.

Members of the Gordonsville United Methodist Church, Bart and Edna lived long meaningful Christian lives. They were loved and respected by their family and friends. After the birth of their grandchildren, they became known to friends in the community as Daddy Bart and Mem-ma. They are buried in the Gordonsville Cemetery. 
GWALTNEY Robert Bart (I0400)
 
14 After the flooding Caney Fork River threatened their home many times in the early 1900's they moved to Gordonsville. When fire destroyed their home in uptown Gordonsville in 1933, they moved into the house across Main Street from the Gordonsville School with Lola's widowed mother. Jeff continued operating a farm on the Caney Fork River until his death. Both Jeff and Lola MacDonald are buried in the Gordonsville Cemetery. MCDONALD Thomas Jefferson (I0969)
 
15 Alexander and family, except the three oldest children, moved in 1845 to Rusk County, Texas. About 1855 they moved to Houston County, Texas. CLARK Alexander (I4012)
 
16 Alexander Smith Norvell was named for the immigrant Smith ancestor, Alexander Smith of Middlesex County, Virginia. Family records say he was educated as a physician in Philadelphia. Shortley after returning to Bedford County, Tennessee from Philadelphia, he bought a lot in Shelbyville, a lot which adjoined the old Presbyterian Church. (Bedford DB JJ-289, 1840). His first child was born in Shelbyville, but he lived most of his adult life at Beechgrove in Coffee County, Tennessee. NORVELL David Alexander Smith, Dr (I0047)
 
17 Andrew Kersh enlisted in the Sixth Regiment on June 23, 1777 in Orangeburg District, South Carolina KERSH Andrew (I1662)
 
18 Angela was born at Baylor Hospital in Dallas at 8:34pm, she weighed 8lbs and 1/2oz. KEY Angela Faye (I1364)
 
19 Ann Washington Norvell attended Female College in Athens, Alabama. NORVELL Anne Washington (I0388)
 
20 As of child of about 8 or so, she ate several bags of peanuts and got some sort of virus from doing so. She lost a lot of weight as a result. Looisng pounds daily right in front of her mother and father, and brothers and sisters. The Doctors announced she had an incurable disease and gave up on her. One of her grandmothers told Jessie's father to put a mustard pack on her. And so he did. He put them on both sides of her until she turned pink on both sides. She came to after awhile and said, "Daddy, I'm hungry". Over the next weeks she gained her weight back and eventually completely healed. HAGER Jessie Mae (I2694)
 
21 As of July 28, 1969 John has had his job at Potts Longhorn Leather Co. located on Oak Grove in Dallas, Texas. He has been there for 55 years and is still working at the age of 71. NORVELL John Wallace (I0061)
 
22 At one time, Edd worked for The Dallas Coffin Co. and for Swift Packing Co. Edd's father, Wallace, worked at the Dallas Coffin Co for 25 years. At the time of his death, he was a leatherworker for Schoelkoph Company. He was living at 1521 First Avenue in Dallas with his wife, Josie and two children, Jimmie and Doris.

Edd Paschall Norvell was killed in an explosion that wrecked the two-story brick building on the northwest corner of Forest and Second Avenues in south Dallas at 8:20pm on Wednesday, May 11, 1927. He died about two hours after being taken to Baylor Hospital. His skull was fractured, and his right leg and right arm were broken. The explosion is believed to have been caused by gas accumulating within the walls and throughout the structure from a leak in the gas pipes, and was so severe that is was heard all over Dallas. The building housed the Second Avenue Pharmacy and the Sunshine Grocery on the ground floor and the Metropolis Lodge, IOOF on the second floor. Edd was among those in the Second Avenue Pharmacy who were crushed under the mass of brick and timbers. Six automobiles which were parked around the building were demolished. Citizens in various sections of Southeast Dallas said bits of brick and mortar were blown about fifteen blocks from the scene. Nathan Euberman was on the street, and was looking directly at the building when the explosion occurred.

"The building raised three feet off the ground," he said. "If I had not seen it with my own eyes I would not have believed it possible. There was a terrific explosion, and a gust of wind passed my face like a cyclone. It staggered me, and the next thing I heard was the sound of falling bricks and wood. I was too dazed to move for a moment, and then went immediately across the street and began work."

Edd was 30 years old at the time and lived at 1521 First Avenue. He was a leather worker at the Schoelkopf Saddlery Company.

He was survived by his wife, Josie; two daughters, Jimmie and Doris; his father, W W Norvell; and four sisters, Mrs W D Yarbrough, Autie, Bonnie and Jewell Norvell. Funeral services were held a 10 am Friday the 13th, at the home of his father at 1314 Claud Street, with the Rev O P Kiker of Centenary Methodist Church officiating. Burial was at Oakland Cemetery on May 13th. His grave is in Section 32, Row 1, Grave #14. It is the 4th grave south of Maude Thomas' stone, alongside & North of the stone for JJ Townsend infant, at left cornner, front of Cemetery near houses on McDermott Street. Funeral services were at Weiland Funeral home (now called Sparkman/Crane) 
NORVELL Eddie Paschal, Sr (I0022)
 
23 At the age of 22 James B Enos is found living in Austin, Texas as a border and a merchant clerk.

In 1910 he is found in Waller, Texa also living as a border. 
ENOS Janas Byron (I4947)
 
24 At the time she married Daniel Green Rogers Kersh, she was a widow with a small son, William Alexander Trigg

She is buried at Guiceland Cemetery near Salmon, Anderson, Texas 
LINDSEY Elizabeth Emma Kathleen (I0029)
 
25 Attended Reinhardt Elementary, WH Gaston Jr Hi, Bryan Adams Senior High School all in Dallas.
She graduated from high shcool in May 1968 with Honors.

Attended Brigham Young University @ Laie, Oahu, Hawaii for the summer session after graduation.

She joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints on September 13, 1968. In Janury 1969, she moved to Provo, Utah and graduated from Brigham Young University, in Elementary Education, in April 1973.

Lived in New Orleans, Louisiana; Pensacola, Florida; Spring, Texas; Houston, Texas; Lafayette, Louisana; Jakarta, Indonesia; Katy, Texas; Caracas, Venezuela; Provo, Utah and, Edmond, Oklahoma.

As a mother, Connie chose to stay at home with her children for 17 years. It was a time she truly treasured. Being the one to raise her children was very important to Connie.

When Stacy, her youngest, went to kindergarten, Connie took a job teaching third grade at Diane Winborn Elementary, this was the school in which her own children attended. She taught there for 4 years. Moving to Venezula, she worked for Escuela Campo Alegre, the International school her children attended. She helped in the middle school as an office assistant, substitute teacher and she taught a Wellness class. From there they spent six months in Orem, Utah where she took a long term subtitute job for a fifth grade class for two months. In Edmond, Oklahoma, she taught fifth grade for three years at Washington Irving Elementary.

In May 2001 Mark, her husband, took a job with Walmart Corp. and currently she lives in Bella Vista, Arkansas where she teaches second grade at Thomas Jefferson Elementary.

 
THARP Connie Jean (I0004)
 
26 Autie went to live with her aunt and uncle, Dr. E J Taylor at the age of three, when her father Dr. Nathan Thomas Paschall passed away. She stayed with them until she was 22 years of age when she married Wallace Waldo Norvell.
Her funeral services were in the same funeral home (Weiland, now called Sparkman/Crane). Her grave at Oakland Cemetery in Dallas, is along side & South of stone of T W Kirpatrick and second grave south of Koerner's stone in far left rear corner of cemetery. 
PASCHAL Autie Jane Sallie Mec (I0033)
 
27 Baptist Minister THARP Reverend Curtis Allen (I0424)
 
28 Benjamin and Elizabeth (Fletcher) Allenthorpe




Benjamin Allenthorpe was born in Stafford County, Virginia, about 1726. Benjamin married Elizabeth Fletcher on August 19, 1746 in Stafford County, Virginia at the Aquia Church.

To this union seven known children were born: 1. Vincent 2. John 3. William 4. Chrnick 5. Presley 6. Berallin 7. Sarah (who was listed on the lease of 1748. Why she was listed there is not known)

After his marriage, Benjamin Allenthorpe moved to King George County, Virginia. It is known at this time, of their lives, that the young couple had little of the world's goods so they leased a tract of land in pioneer country. Benjamin was literate for he signed his name as a witness to his father's will and he signed his name to this lease. As important as reading and writing are to an individual, they are of little help in making a living in a new territory. The lease was made for three years, from December 20, 1748 to December 20, 1751. It seems that William Newton was making excessive demands to expect in that time to have Benjamin to erect a small dwelling house, a barn, a corn house and to have planted one hundred apple trees, one hundred peach trees, twenty-five cherry trees, to be enclosed by a fence, plus a yearly rent of five hundred thirty pounds of tobacco, and two shillings and six pence. How would a young man, even though he was young and strong, be able to complete the buildings, plant the fruit trees, cultivate tobacco in three years. In addition he had to have a garden and livestock to feed the growing family. Having no slaves to help him, no doubt his brothers, Jacob and John, helped him as well as some of his many Sebastin cousins. As stringent as the terms of this lease were, the form must have been customary for William Newton made another recorded lease with the same terms. One can but admire and respect this remarkable young man and his wife who undertook such a formidable task. They were industrious, thrifty and good managers to accomplish this work. It is a privilege to have such strong sturdy dependable people for our ancestors.

When Benjamin signed the lease, he signed as Benjm Allentharp. This is the beginning of th euse of "a" in the name instead of the "o". For many years thereafter the anme was written Allentharp.

It is to be noted that Benjamin Allenthorpe along with sons John, William, Charnick, Presley, and Berallin fought for the Tories (British) in the American Revolution. It's not known why son Vincent chose the American side. The name of Benjamin Allenthorpe was on the early list of Tories. No records are found in South Carolina to tell what became of Benjamin Allenthorpe but a record has been found in England that tells that he died sometime between April 24, 1781 and April 19, 1782. A copy of this list has been placed in the library of Congress. "Tories Murdered in the South Carolina Up Country in the Revolution" says, "In giving the above list of Persons massacred in this Province we have confined us to the 96 Dist., the Southern part of Camden and upper part of Orangeburg with five in Charleston and from every account we can safely say that at least thrice the number have been Butchered and Hanged in the like manner - not one of these named fell in action but were killed at their Plantations or after they had been made Prisoners - we would particularize the circumstances but think it an unnecessary intrusion upon your time. " (page 126 of this list includes Benjamin Tharp)
Thomas Fletchall, Coll
Joseph Robinson, Lt Coll So
Co Caro Toyle
Endorsed in Colo Fletchalls .. of 19th April 1782


References:
Notes of the Tharp and Allentharp Families - Eleanor Davis
Sifting Through The Ashes - Eleanor Davis McSwain
Georgia Archives

 
ALLENTHARP Benjamin (I1937)
 
29 Benjamin E. Kersh

Services for Benjamin Edward Kersh, 89, of Palestine will be at 2 p.m. Wednesday at Herrington Land of Memory Chapel with the Rev. Alan Van Hooser officiating. Burial will follow at Strongs Cemetery under the direction of Herrington Land of Memory Funeral Home.

Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. tonight at the funeral home.

Pallbearers will be James Weaver, Calvin Nicholson, David Weaver, Robert Kersh, Shawn O'Connor, Keith Matthews, Jimmy Lucas and Roger Ray. Honorary pallbearers will be nephews.

Mr. Kersh left this world on Monday to join our Lord and his beloved wife of 54 years, Mary C. "Mae" Patterson Kersh and his other family members who have preceded him in death.


Mr. and Mrs. Kersh were married in Anderson County on Dec. 16, 1948.

Mr. Kersh leaves to cherish his memory one daughter, Kathryn Kersh Nicholson and her husband Calvin Wayne Nicholson of Palestine and a stepdaughter, Helen Bostick Weaver and her husband James William Weaver of Junction; two brothers, Rayford M. Kersh of San Antonio and Swanner N. Kersh of Jacksonville; and a sister, Alveda S. Brunette of Rhinelander, Wis.; five grandchildren, David Weaver, Melody Weaver Finley, Jennifer O'Connor Matthews, Shawn Patrick O'Connor and Stephanie O'Connor Lucas; eight great-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents, two daughters, Mary Jane Bostick Hobbs and Carolyn Jean Kersh; sisters, Viola Eloise Kersh and Mae Kersh Owens, Minnie Lee Ray, and Laura LaRue, Irene Pharris and Alma Schulte; and brothers, Desmond R. Kersh and Wilson Kersh.

Mr. Kersh was born Feb. 12, 1914 in Tenaha to Robert Lee Kersh and Sisley McKay Kersh. He was raised in Salmon. He was a member of Pisgah Baptist Church. He was an avid gardener and he entertained with his guitar at nursing homes for many years. He was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3907, National Association of Federal Employees and a life member of the Disabled American Veterans.

Mr. Kersh is a descendant of Lutheran immigrants who fled Zuzenhausen, German, due to religious persecution landing in Charleston, S.C. in 1744. The Kersh family settled in Orangeburg District there until traveling by wagon train with other families from the area to Rankin County, Miss. in 1828. Just prior to the Civil War and immediately following it, Mr. Kersh's grandfather and his two great-uncles, Enos and Ezra Kersh, relocated their families to Anderson County where they raised their families as farmers and railroad men. The Kershes were God-fearing people, a close-knit family with deep religious conviction and an exemplary work ethic.

Mr. Kersh's military career took him to many locations, among them, Victoria where he was stationed at Foster Field Air Force Base in the 1950s. Following his retirement from the Air Force he worked for Burns Detective Agency as a security officer at the carbide plant and two years later went to work for the U.S. Post Office as a mail carrier. Upon his retirement from the post office in 1971, Mr. and Mrs. Kersh moved back to Anderson County where they both grew up and became sweethearts.

From the 1700s until the present time, a member of this family has proudly served in the armed forces in every conflict that this nation has been involved in, on our own soil as well as overseas. Mr. Kersh served his country in the United State Air Force for 20 years and retired in 1958 as a Master Sergeant and hangar chief assigned to the 27th Consolidated line Maintenance Squadron at Cannon Air Force Base in Clovis, N.M. He first enlisted in the Air Corps in 1940. In 1942 he participated in the transportation of 33 bombers to the Chinese Air Force and stated in the China-Burma-India Theater as a member of the 341st Bomb Group. He returned to the U.S. in 1944 and was assigned to Walla Walla Army Field in Washington until the close of the war. Following various statewide assignments after World War II, Master Sgt. Kersh served in Japan from Jan. 1953 until March 1954.

Among his eight great-grandchildren are his namesakes, Benjamin Keith Matthews and Braden Edward O'Connor.

He's gone to worlds above where Saints and angels meet, to realize our Savior's love and worship at his feet. 
KERSH Benjamin Edward (I1713)
 
30 Bessie Mae Watson

Graveside services for Mrs. Bessie Mae Watson, 85, of Chandler, Texas will be held Thursday, March 15, 2007 at 11:00 a.m. at Chandler Memorial Cemetery, Chandler, under direction of Chandler Memorial Funeral Home, with Rev. Tommy Weems officiating.

Mrs. Watson died March 11, 2007 in a hospice facility in Tyler, Texas. She was born December 16, 1921 to Jace Lee and Jettie Mae Mayhew, on the banks of the Sabine River near Gladewater. She was the youngest of 4 children and the only girl. Her brothers were J.C. (Jake) Mayhew, Oscar Mayhew, and Lee Mayhew.


In the late 1920s the family moved to a farm in Cove, Arkansas and did well until the depression started. They had left East Texas in a Model T truck which was mortgaged along with the farm in Cove. So the return trip to East Texas was by wagon with a team of mules. They eventually settled in Winona, Texas.

On October 29, 1938 Bessie married William Dee Watson. They became parents of three sons. Mrs. Watson was one of the first telephone operators in Winona, operating the switchboard in their home. The late 1940s found the family living near Lindale and growing roses for a living.

She was a Baptist and owner of Watson's Tropical Fish.

Her husband, Dee Watson, preceded her in death, as well as her parents, brothers, J.C. Mayhew, Oscar Mayhew and Lee Mayhew, and one son, Melvin Ray Watson.

Survivors include sons, Gerald Dee Watson of Mansfield, Texas and Jace Franklin Watson of Chandler, Texas; 8 grandchildren and 9 great-grandchildren.

Honorary pallbearers are Jeff Watson, Jimmy Watson, Clifford Watson, Glen Watson, Ruben Watson and Randy Watson.
 
MAYHEW Bessie Mae (I7810)
 
31 Billy was five years old when his mother, Helen, married Vander Cozelle. He was raised by his mother and step father. Bill was a Police officer with the County of Dallas from 1969 to 1974. Following that he was a part of the Tharp Tire Co until 1987. In 1988 he became a Deputy Sheriff of Smith County, Texas and served in that capasity untill 1995. He then became a Criminal District Attorney Investigator also in Smith County and servers there until the present day. WELK Billy John (I0682)
 
32 BIOGRAPHY

Allen Tharp is the Chairman & Chief Executive Officer of Allen Tharp LLC, of San Antonio, Texas and Olde England?s Lion and Rose British restaurant and pubs, as well as a minority partner in a chain of quick service chicken restaurants called Golden Fried Chick. Tharp also runs a small construction company that Allen Tharp?s endeavors provide over 800 jobs to San Antonians.

Allen Tharp LLC is a small company with approximately 650 employees . He founded this company in 1985 and has specialized expertise in many areas of the hospitality industry.

Allen Tharp LLC currently is responsible for operating a large, complex management and staffing contract for the military, specializing in professional food and equipment management contracts. Tharp?s company serves almost one million high quality meals per month to local military personnel.

Mr. Tharp?s technical expertise is manifested in the many years of accolades for outstanding contract performance that his company has received from the military and successfully competes against competitors like Marriott, Aramarc, Moor?s Cafeterias, Southern Food Services, etc?

Allen Tharp has also founded and developed a chain of British Restaurant/pubs called Olde England?s Lion and Rose, with around 150 employees in San Antonio. Tharp designed the Lion and Rose to replicate some of the finest pubs in London. Tharp was responsible for developing all operational aspects of the restaurant, from implementing a rigorous training system for all Lion and Rose employees to incorporating the best traditional British and American recipes, as well as all architectural and design aspects.

Tharp?s latest project is Golden Fried Chick, in which he purchased a minority interest with the intentions of not only expanding the concept in Texas, but also to take GFC to several regions in Asia including China.

Mr. Tharp has served as a liaison for Government and Legislative Affairs. He has also served as a speaker at various restaurant industry conferences and is an active member of the President?s forum.

A 1981 graduate of the University Of Texas Permian Basin, with a B.A. in political science, he was Suma Cum Laude and a member of the Dean?s honor role. He also minored in languages: Spanish and Russian and worked on a Masters in Business and attended the University of Irvine in California.

 
THARP James Allen (I10270)
 
33 Birth: Jul. 27, 1913
Death: Aug. 13, 2008

Arles Eugene "Top" Haden, 95 of San Angelo died Monday August 11, 2008 at an area nursing home. Family visitation will be 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM Wednesday August 13, 2008 at the Robert Massie Funeral Home. Funeral services will be 10:00 AM Thursday August 14, 2008 at the Robert Massie Riverside Chapel, with the Rev. James Mitchell, officiating. Burial will follow at Lawnhaven Memorial Gardens. Arrangements are by Robert Massie Funeral Home. Top was born July 27, 1913 in Brown County to Eugene Tharp and Catherine Joplin Haden. He married Ada Lucille Eubank on August 30, 1937 in San Angelo and they shared 61 wonderful years together until her death on August 11, 1998. Top ran several retail stores including the 7-10 Food Store, R & R Sausage and the Circle "M" Motel. Top was a longtime active member and deacon of the Immanuel Baptist Church and an active member of the North Side Lion's Club. He is preceded in death by his wife, Lucille; brothers; Oswald Tharp and Joplin Haden and one sister, Louise Haden Sheppard. He is survived by three daughters; Ada Cox of San Angelo, Janie Ellington and husband, Robert of Combine, TX., and Stelda Jones of Lancaster, TX., four grandsons; Richard Cox and wife, Cris of Colorado Springs, CO., Evan Cox of San Angelo, Jeff Ellington and wife, Melissa of Mesquite, TX., Ben Ellington and wife, Sheri of Killeen, TX., six greatgrandchildren; Kayla Cox of San Angelo, Brandon, Sarah and Samantha Ellington, all of Killeen, TX., Amanda and husband, Martin Valenzuela of Colorado Springs, CO., Jennifer and husband, Nico Valenzuela of Fresno CA., future great granddaughter, Abigail Ellington; two great great grandsons; Ethan and Evan Valenzuela of Fresno, CA., future great great granddaughter, Leilah Valenzuela; three sisters-in-law; Frances Haden of Abilene, Reba Eubank of San Angelo and Eva Stork and husband, Walter of Las Vegas, NV., Niece and nephews; Mary Dell Barron of San Angelo, Robert Eubank of San Angelo, Vernon Gene Sheppard, Waymon Sheppard and Jerry Sheppard of Bangs, TX., Bill Haden of Pipeline, TX., and Homer Don Haden of Merkel, TX. Pallbearers will be Robert Eubank, R.D. Barron, Lynn Jetton, Ronnie Jetton and Fred Armstrong. 
HADEN Arles Eugene (I5229)
 
34 BOBBY LEE PETTY SR.

Services for Bobby Lee Petty Sr., 55, of Houston, formerly of Kilgore, were held at 10 a.m. Thursday, July 7, 2005 at Rader Funeral Home Chapel. Mr. Petty died Sunday, July 3, 2005 in Kilgore.

He was born Aug. 3, 1949 in Kilgore to Huey and Odessa Petty. He worked for PST Trucking Co. as a driver trainer, an assistant director for the Road To Recovery Center in Houston.

He is preceded in death by his parents; two brothers, Jim Petty and Bill Petty; a son, Bobby Lee Petty Jr.

He is survived by two daughters, Shawn Marie Hunt of Atwood, Tennessee, Jeannie Randall of Trezevant, Tennessee; sister, Kathy Copeland of Kilgore; two brothers, Edward Petty and Earl Petty, both of Kilgore; 10 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; many other loving family and friends.

Pallbearers were Bobby Lee Petty III, B.J. Reyes Jr., Chris Petty, Tony Pett, Norman Copeland Jr. and Russell Copeland.

Honorary pallbearers will be Charles London, Don Wedgeworth and Bruce Nelson.

 
PETTY Bobby Lee, Sr (I3386)
 
35 Bondsman: Callum Barnes which is belived to be the Callum Barnes born in North Carolina in 1795 who is also the father of William Barnes born 1827 in Tennessee. Family F0096
 
36 Born 5:04 am at Saint Paul's Hospital in Dallas, the attending Physician, C Vincent White. Attended Reinhardt Elementary, WH Gaston Jr Hi, Bryan Adams Senior High School.

Graduated University of Texas @ Dallas

Became a CPA and established his own CPA firm 
THARP Ronald Lee (I0005)
 
37 Brennan is the twin of Hunter HOFFMAN Brennan Gregory (I1395)
 
38 Buried in Brookside Cemetery, Eastex Freeway at Louder (449-6511) MILLER Louise Vivian (I1899)
 
39 Buried in Edom Cemetery JONES Sarah Emiline (I0923)
 
40 Buried in Edom Cemetery SHINN Thomas (I1332)
 
41 Buried in Edom Cemetery PRAYTOR Lucinda (I1337)
 
42 Buried in Edom Cemetery SHINN William Harris Coleman (I1340)
 
43 Buried in Houston, TX SUMMERS Ulysses Perry (I0138)
 
44 By 1858, John Hamilton and family were living in Karnes County, Texas where he was a stock raiser. He volunteered for the Confederate Army at Karnes County in 1861. His widow was granted a pension in 1899 (No 04999) at Brady, McCulloch County, Texas. PASCHAL John Hamilton (I0528)
 
45 Came to America 1766 on the ship, Belfast Packet. GEYSLER Eva Margaretta (I1671)
 
46 Cannon Courier December 4, 1942 Services Held For T. B. Carnahan, 63, At Curlee Church



Funeral services for T. B. Carnahan, 63, who died Tuesday at the home of his sister, Mrs. J. F. Williams at Curlee in the 3rd district, after an illness of two months, were conducted at the Curlee Church of Christ at 1 o?clock Wednesday, November 25, by the minister, O. P. Baird, of Woodbury.

He had been a member of the church since early in life.

Among the survivors are one sister, Mrs. J. F. Williams; one brother, Dave Carnahan, of Texas; and a number of nieces and nephews.

Burial in Curlee cemetery.




 
CARNAHAN Thomas Basil (I5162)
 
47 Carl Worsham was John's sister. WORSHAM Mary Carl H (I1906)
 
48 Catherine A Tharp and James Hoss, both of Shreveport were married at the residence of J A Simpson, near this city on Thursday evening the 20th by Rev R S Trippett. This was the home of Catherine's older sister, Ann Spencer Tharp who was the wife of James Alexander Simpson. Family F1747
 
49 Charity Mitchell Ross Hall was the daughter of Benjamin Mitchell and Charity Mitchell. After Reverend John Ross died, she married Captain John Hall. She is buried with her son, Benjamin Ross and family.  MITCHELL Charity (I9687)
 
50 Charles Culberson Kersh 81, of 1009 N. Ross, died in a Tyler hospital at 1:45 a.m. today. Kersh, a native of Brandon, Miss., lived in Tyler for the past 10 years. Funeral to be held Dec. 19 in Burks-Walker-Tippit Funeral Chapel, Tyler, Texas at 2 p.m. with Rev. Riley of the Wesley Methodist Church officiating. Burial to be in the Memorial Park Cemetery, Tyler, Texas - section "B".

Survivors are his wife Margaret, a son Charles Samuel Kersh of Brownfield, two daughters, Mrs. William A. Stewart of North Hollywood, California, Mrs. Lester Gallup of Houston, a brother, Sam Kersh of Palestine, Texs, two sisters Mrs. Clara Williams of Electra, Texas and Mrs. Emma Hollis of Houston, Texas, five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. He was a member of the Lindale, Texas Masonic Lodge.

NOTE: Mrs. William A. Stewart - Hortense Kersh - Mrs. Lester Gallup - Harriet (Hattie) Mae Kersh, Mrs. Clara Williams - Clara Devoe Kersh Ream Williams - Mrs. Emma Hollis - Emma Rogers Kersh Curry Hollis.

Pallbearers at Charles's funeral were Benton Luke Curry, David Boice, Jacob Norvell, Charles Trigg, Harvey Miller and Charles Hill. 
KERSH Charles Culberson (I0207)
 

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